Child Custody

© 2020 by Ganolli Law. 
New York Attorney Advertising: This website is designed for general information only. The information presented in this site should not be construed to be formal legal advice nor the formation of a lawyer/client relationship. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome.

Child Custody in New York

Child custody is one of the most stressful and difficult practice areas of family law because of the depth and intensity of the emotions that parents have for their child or children. Every moment that a child is out of a parent’s site and custody is an eternity to most parents. Concerns about parenting are one of the top issues that divorcing and dissolving couples bring to our doors.

Parents worry about everything from what schools their child will attend to what extra-curricular activities they will be involved in.


The Ganolli Law will work closely with our client and whenever possible the non-custodial parent to create the best possible situation for the minor children. New York State judges try very hard to make good decisions in custody cases and are extremely fair-minded when it comes to disputes, custody, support, and visitation. Our judges will always promote the best interest of the child and his or her welfare above the desires of his or her parents.

Who Gets Custody?

Child custody is determined upon several factors, but with the end result of the child(ren) going through as little change and upheaval as possible. Custody is awarded to the parent who can provide the most stable environment for the minor children.

The New York Family Courts look at these things:

  • Which of the parents provided the most care and/or nurture of the child prior to the “event”?

  • What are the strengths and weaknesses of the parents?

  • What are the work schedules of the parents?

  • Have there been incidents of physical or mental abuse?

  • What is the physical & mental health of the parent seeking custodial rights?

  • Are there other siblings and where do they live?

  • The child’s preference